I am graduating this year with PhD in Business and Public Policy at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business and starting this fall as an Assistant Professor in the Strategy and Entrepreneurship group at UNC Chapel Hill. My research focuses broadly on strategy and innovation and more specifically on the causal impact of the patent system on firm decisions and outcomes outcomes. I have experience teaching in competitive and corporate strategy and in innovation. Prior to graduate school, I worked for several years as a U.S. patent attorney.

My job market paper investigates the role of the legal right to exclude in the sale of patents, which can provide substantial social welfare advantages through gains to trade but is plagued by significant market imperfections. I show that an exogenous increase in the scope of the legal right to exclude increases the likelihood that a patent is sold, but that the effect is reduced in thin or congested markets. In other papers, I study the effect of winning a patent race, develop a new measure of patent-to-patent textual similarity, and examine changing trends in patent citations. Throughout my research, I apply my background as an attorney to ground my work in the functioning of institutions, and I apply my training in computer science and mathematics to develop new data sets by writing computationally intensive programs and executing them in cloud computing environments.